Tuesday, May 30, 2006

TTC Strike Only Hurt the Working Man

Taylor & Co. made an excellent point about yesterday's TTC wildcat strike:

In my case a transit strike simply means working from home; at the Firm, something like 75% of the workforce uses laptops and mobile computing devices. Of the seven people in my team, two were on vacation, two took the GO Train (and subsequently did arrive at the office), and the remaining three worked from home. We could still communicate via phone, e-mail and corporate instant messaging service. I understand even the front-line grunts on national help desk are issued with laptops and the ability to route calls to their homes. So from the Firm's perspective, yesterday was like any other day. Tasks delayed: none. Projects delayed: none. Deadlines missed: none. Industry humming along as usual, in other words.

Congratulations, Bob Kinnear and Local 113. Keep on fighting 21st century commerce with 19th-century tactics; while you were out on picket lines, I was in air-conditioned comfort at home. I managed to stay on top of my workload and will be rebated a day's Metropass costs, to boot. Your 800 maintenance workers will get docked a day's pay and be a day behind on their duties. You know who you hurt with this wildcat strike? Students and seniors, for starters. The poor, who can't afford 30-buck cab fares downtown. And others whose living depends on mass agglomeration of commuters downtown -- people working in coffee shops, hot dog stands, food court outlets -- not to mention all those businesses retailing inside subway stations. You know, ordinary working-class joes. Way to stick it to the Man.
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Hat Tip: Babbling Brooks

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